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DID YOU KNOW: COLD WATER SWIMMING

What if I told you that swimming in cold water is good for your body and mind? So, does cold water equal euphoria or pneumonia?

 

I agree, at first glance, cold water and fun do not really seem to mix..

 

If I ask you, for example, what comes to mind when you hear the words "water" and "well-being", it is likely that some of you imagine the clear water of a Caribbean hot spring or the massaging whirlpools of a jacuzzi. And in both cases, the water doesn't tend to dip below 27°C!

 

There is no doubt that bathing in warm or temperate water will give us, at the time and for a while after, a feeling of euphoria. But did you know that choosing cold water would allow you to perpetuate this state of mind in the long run?

Believe me, if you take all the necessary precautions, dips in good old cold water will give you unexpected physical and psychological benefits!

 

Let's go through the details of this clever way to look after your body (and mind)!

THE BENEFITS OF COLD WATER

 

Have you heard of "Loony Dook" or the "Polar Bear Plunge"? Or other groups of intrepid swimmers who wait for winter to seek out the virtues of cold water?

 

Despite what you might think, it is indeed true that cold water has real benefits for blood circulation, the immune system and also your mood!

The cold water will refuel your organs by nourishing and draining your cells, and thus stimulating blood circulation.

This environment is also conducive to the development and increase of lymphocytes in your body, which will strengthen your immune system. Regular cold water swimmers are often less prone to colds and other respiratory infections.

 

Experts are united in promoting the psychological benefits of taking a little dip or paddle in cold water. It causes your body to release lots of endorphins (the famous happiness hormone) and has a radical influence in reducing pain and inflammation.

As a bonus, cold water is a powerful way to burn calories by forcing your metabolism to work harder under the stress of temperature.

 

So say goodbye to any bad fat and bad moods!

 

Note: for even more benefits, the best thing is cold seawater! Seawater is well known for its anti-anxiety, euphoric and antidepressant properties.

BUT WHO CAME UP WITH THIS IDEA?

 

Swimming in cold water is not yet a very popular sport in this country...

But, if we travel a little further north to Scandinavia, we can see that this trend has already become a sport in its own right.

 

In Finland in particular, swimming in icy lakes is not unusual, quite the opposite. This common activity is very beneficial for health and also helps to clear the mind.

And, apparently, when the Finns throw themselves into the water, it's no joke! Several times a year, more than 150,000 of them take part in cold water races.

 

Their Norwegian neighbours get up to similar icy antics by swimming—sometimes over very long distances—across the Fjords, where the water hovers at a chilly 6°C...

CERTAIN PRECAUTIONS TO TAKE

 

It is of course important to be aware that cold water puts stress on the body!

Even if your body has an impressive ability to adapt, and can acclimatise to cold waters faster than you think, don't go throwing yourself heart and soul into the frozen waters without thinking.

 

Firstly, if you like the sound of this discipline, I recommend that you consult your doctor to eliminate any health concerns.

Once declared fit, do not make the mistake of rushing into it. Getting used to swimming in cold water takes time and, like any sport, training, to avoid any risks.

 

My advice would be to start in temperate water—the sea, a lake or other body of water—at the end of the summer. Then, continue your swimming habits into the autumn and winter, so that your body gradually gets used to the drop in temperature. For this to work, you should be getting out there fairly regularly.

 

As for getting into the water, the principle remains the same, immerse yourself gradually, remembering to wet the back of your neck first. Hyperventilation is normal at first. Breathe out slowly to get your body gradually used to the cold.

When you leave the water, let your body shiver. This reaction is quite normal and is designed to get your blood flowing to your extremities.

 

 

You are now a theoretical cold water swimming pro. Next it's time to put it into practice! What do you say?

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